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  • 🇧🇷 DOMINGO DE CURIOSIDADE: O Primeiro arranha céu do mundo foi construído em Chicago, Estados Unidos. Seu nome era Home Insurance Building. Antes dele ser construído, as pessoas estavam preocupadas com os elevadores e com medo que a estrutura não aguentasse. Até que um homem chamado William Jenney descobriu uma maneira de utilizar vigas de aço para o esqueleto do edifício (enquanto outros edifícios usavam tijolos). O edifício foi concluído em 1885, mas infelizmente foi demolido em 1931. Building tinha 10 andares e 138 metros de altura. ----- 🇺🇸 SUNDAY CURIOSITY: The first skyscraper in the world was built in Chicago, USA. Its name was Home Insurance Building. Before this building, people were worried about the elevators and afraid that the structure of the building wasn’t strong enough. Then a man named William Jenney discovered a way to use steel beams for the skeleton of the building (as other buildings was using bricks). This building was completed in 1885, but unfortunately it was demolished in 1931. The Home Insurance Building had 10 floors and 138 meters high. #checkincompaulamaluf #domingodecuriosidade #sundaycuriosity #prediomaisantigodomundo #building #predioshistoricos #oldestbuilding #homeinsurancebuilding #curiosidadededomingo
  • 🇧🇷 DOMINGO DE CURIOSIDADE: O Primeiro arranha céu do mundo foi construído em Chicago, Estados Unidos. Seu nome era Home Insurance Building. Antes dele ser construído, as pessoas estavam preocupadas com os elevadores e com medo que a estrutura não aguentasse. Até que um homem chamado William Jenney descobriu uma maneira de utilizar vigas de aço para o esqueleto do edifício (enquanto outros edifícios usavam tijolos). O edifício foi concluído em 1885, mas infelizmente foi demolido em 1931. Building tinha 10 andares e 138 metros de altura. ----- 🇺🇸 SUNDAY CURIOSITY: The first skyscraper in the world was built in Chicago, USA. Its name was Home Insurance Building. Before this building, people were worried about the elevators and afraid that the structure of the building wasn’t strong enough. Then a man named William Jenney discovered a way to use steel beams for the skeleton of the building (as other buildings was using bricks). This building was completed in 1885, but unfortunately it was demolished in 1931. The Home Insurance Building had 10 floors and 138 meters high. #checkincompaulamaluf #domingodecuriosidade #sundaycuriosity #prediomaisantigodomundo #building #predioshistoricos #oldestbuilding #homeinsurancebuilding #curiosidadededomingo
  • 438 4 3 July, 2016
  • The Rookery

Burnham & Root

Chicago  1885 
#therookery, #burnhamandroot, #chicagoarchitecture, #johnwellbornroot, #danielburnham, #chicagoarchitecture, #americanarchitecture, #historyofarchitecture, #modernarchitecture, #skyscraper, #homeinsurancebuilding, #williamlebaronjenney, #atrium, #skylight, #ironskeletonframe, #terracotta, #spatialsequence, 
As I mentioned in the first post, the Rookery’s site was large enough that Burnham & Root could employ a double-loaded corridor floor plan.  The inner ring of offices, as did the exterior perimeter offices, still needed direct exterior exposure for daylight and natural ventilation that forced Root to pull the skylight all the way down from its traditional height at the roof to the point where it hovered, somewhat menacingly, over the 62' by 71' atrium at the relatively low level of the third floor (image 1-source: Chuckman’s photos on Wordpress), a detail that echoed W.W. Boyington’s Grand Hotel and George Post’s New York Produce Exchange. Although denied the opportunity to add another of his designs to Chicago's growing collection of tall, light-filled atria (Grannis Block, Burlington, First National Bank, Royal Insurance, and Traders), Root took advantage of the lower location of the Rookery's skylight to offer a visitor the opportunity to penetrate up and through it, blurring the boundary between what was inside and what was outside. 
In essence, the play of contrasts, especially that between outside versus inside and between dark versus light, was the theme of Root's rhapsody of movement through space and light in the Rookery.  Penetrating the dark masonry exterior through the stone triumphal arch (image 2), one entered a two-story vestibule of white stone and onyx with gold-leafed trim (image 3-this was remodeled by Wright in 1905). Stairs at both sides joined overhead in a balcony that beckoned a visitor up to the entresol or mezzanine.  Flanking the stairs going up were vomitoria that led to the basement where the vaults of the building's owner, the Central Safety Deposit Company, were located.
  • The Rookery

    Burnham & Root

    Chicago 1885
    #therookery , #burnhamandroot , #chicagoarchitecture , #johnwellbornroot , #danielburnham , #chicagoarchitecture , #americanarchitecture , #historyofarchitecture , #modernarchitecture , #skyscraper , #homeinsurancebuilding , #williamlebaronjenney , #atrium , #skylight , #ironskeletonframe , #terracotta , #spatialsequence ,
    As I mentioned in the first post, the Rookery’s site was large enough that Burnham & Root could employ a double-loaded corridor floor plan. The inner ring of offices, as did the exterior perimeter offices, still needed direct exterior exposure for daylight and natural ventilation that forced Root to pull the skylight all the way down from its traditional height at the roof to the point where it hovered, somewhat menacingly, over the 62' by 71' atrium at the relatively low level of the third floor (image 1-source: Chuckman’s photos on Wordpress), a detail that echoed W.W. Boyington’s Grand Hotel and George Post’s New York Produce Exchange. Although denied the opportunity to add another of his designs to Chicago's growing collection of tall, light-filled atria (Grannis Block, Burlington, First National Bank, Royal Insurance, and Traders), Root took advantage of the lower location of the Rookery's skylight to offer a visitor the opportunity to penetrate up and through it, blurring the boundary between what was inside and what was outside.
    In essence, the play of contrasts, especially that between outside versus inside and between dark versus light, was the theme of Root's rhapsody of movement through space and light in the Rookery. Penetrating the dark masonry exterior through the stone triumphal arch (image 2), one entered a two-story vestibule of white stone and onyx with gold-leafed trim (image 3-this was remodeled by Wright in 1905). Stairs at both sides joined overhead in a balcony that beckoned a visitor up to the entresol or mezzanine. Flanking the stairs going up were vomitoria that led to the basement where the vaults of the building's owner, the Central Safety Deposit Company, were located.
  • 630 20 24 April, 2019
  • The Rookery

Burnham & Root

Chicago  1885 
#therookery, #burnhamandroot, #chicagoarchitecture, #johnwellbornroot, #danielburnham, #chicagoarchitecture, #americanarchitecture, #historyofarchitecture, #modernarchitecture, #skyscraper, #homeinsurancebuilding, #williamlebaronjenney, #urbandesign, #lasallestreet, #atrium, #courtyard, 
In May 1885, John Wellborn Root was provided with an urban design challenge that most architects can only dream of: he and his partner, Daniel Burnham were commissioned by Burnham’s childhood friend, E.C. Waller, to design a 10-story office building for the southeast corner of La Salle and Adams Streets, what had been the location of one of the city’s water tanks around which Chicago’s “temporary” city hall was erected following the 1871 fire.  As the tower had been the home to numerous birds, its name, “The Rookery” had been cynically carried over to City Hall in honor of the political shenanigans (bird droppings) for which Chicago was already infamous.  Immediately across La Salle Street on the southwest block sat Root’s own Insurance Exchange (image 2), completed in 1884, while the Adams facade would be facing the side elevation of William Le Baron Jenney's Home Insurance Building (image 3), then just beginning construction. 
The new building that would also be known as “The Rookery,” against the wishes of its owners, not only provided Root with the opportunity to show how far this new building type, the skyscraper had evolved both in design and in construction technology during the past hectic twelve months, but also demanded of him a certain urbanistic response in its design to attempt to synthesize the alignment of the geometries of the two existing buildings in his design of the new building’s facades: as the Rookery would directly face the Insurance Exchange with approximately the same length of facade along La Salle, the opportunity to create a portal to Chicago's financial district (image 4) with these two brick bookends was one that Root must have quietly savored.  It is intriguing then, to wonder why he did not use the cherry red brick of the Insurance Exchange, but opted instead for a reddish-brown brick for the ...
  • The Rookery

    Burnham & Root

    Chicago 1885
    #therookery , #burnhamandroot , #chicagoarchitecture , #johnwellbornroot , #danielburnham , #chicagoarchitecture , #americanarchitecture , #historyofarchitecture , #modernarchitecture , #skyscraper , #homeinsurancebuilding , #williamlebaronjenney , #urbandesign , #lasallestreet , #atrium , #courtyard ,
    In May 1885, John Wellborn Root was provided with an urban design challenge that most architects can only dream of: he and his partner, Daniel Burnham were commissioned by Burnham’s childhood friend, E.C. Waller, to design a 10-story office building for the southeast corner of La Salle and Adams Streets, what had been the location of one of the city’s water tanks around which Chicago’s “temporary” city hall was erected following the 1871 fire. As the tower had been the home to numerous birds, its name, “The Rookery” had been cynically carried over to City Hall in honor of the political shenanigans (bird droppings) for which Chicago was already infamous. Immediately across La Salle Street on the southwest block sat Root’s own Insurance Exchange (image 2), completed in 1884, while the Adams facade would be facing the side elevation of William Le Baron Jenney's Home Insurance Building (image 3), then just beginning construction.
    The new building that would also be known as “The Rookery,” against the wishes of its owners, not only provided Root with the opportunity to show how far this new building type, the skyscraper had evolved both in design and in construction technology during the past hectic twelve months, but also demanded of him a certain urbanistic response in its design to attempt to synthesize the alignment of the geometries of the two existing buildings in his design of the new building’s facades: as the Rookery would directly face the Insurance Exchange with approximately the same length of facade along La Salle, the opportunity to create a portal to Chicago's financial district (image 4) with these two brick bookends was one that Root must have quietly savored. It is intriguing then, to wonder why he did not use the cherry red brick of the Insurance Exchange, but opted instead for a reddish-brown brick for the ...
  • 458 11 11 April, 2019
  • The Rookery

Burnham & Root

Chicago  1885 
#therookery, #burnhamandroot, #chicagoarchitecture, #johnwellbornroot, #danielburnham, #chicagoarchitecture, #americanarchitecture, #historyofarchitecture, #modernarchitecture, #skyscraper, #homeinsurancebuilding, #williamlebaronjenney, #arcade, #superimposedarcades, #georgeafuller, 
In the design of the Rookery’s base, Root was confronted with having to choose between Jenney's clearly-articulated, two-story base of rusticated stone (image 2) or his own recent experiments in blending the stone base and brick body at an intermediate, transition story, which he had employed in the Insurance Exchange.  Evidently, he realized that this experiment was less than satisfactory, for he never again used two different materials in the transition story of his commercial buildings.  In the Rookery, he returned to the standard two-story base of one material, like that of the Home Insurance.  The problem that Root addressed in the design of the Rookery's base (image 3) was quite evident in Jenney's design of the Home Insurance Building's base.  Why Jenney had projected the stone band at the second floor in front of the face of the piers seems a mystery, for this detail not only broke the two-story base into two horizontal layers, but it also prevented the reading of the two-story piers as a set of vertical legs upon which was set the iron-reinforced masonry cage above.  Instead, Jenney’s design read more as a stone arcade in the second story that was set atop the very stubby stone piers of the ground floor or basement. 
Not one to shun a challenge or to stop experimenting in the design of his buildings, Root attempted to show how to detail such a base 'better.' He also tried make his base more 'open' than Jenney's elevation by inserting oriel windows between two-story polished red granite columns that had a smaller diameter than an equivalent brick pier (due to granite’s higher compression strength). These columns could have just as easily been inspired by the large columns that Jenney placed at the entrance of the Home Insurance, a detail for which the building had become famous as soon as they were put in place...
  • The Rookery

    Burnham & Root

    Chicago 1885
    #therookery , #burnhamandroot , #chicagoarchitecture , #johnwellbornroot , #danielburnham , #chicagoarchitecture , #americanarchitecture , #historyofarchitecture , #modernarchitecture , #skyscraper , #homeinsurancebuilding , #williamlebaronjenney , #arcade , #superimposedarcades , #georgeafuller ,
    In the design of the Rookery’s base, Root was confronted with having to choose between Jenney's clearly-articulated, two-story base of rusticated stone (image 2) or his own recent experiments in blending the stone base and brick body at an intermediate, transition story, which he had employed in the Insurance Exchange. Evidently, he realized that this experiment was less than satisfactory, for he never again used two different materials in the transition story of his commercial buildings. In the Rookery, he returned to the standard two-story base of one material, like that of the Home Insurance. The problem that Root addressed in the design of the Rookery's base (image 3) was quite evident in Jenney's design of the Home Insurance Building's base. Why Jenney had projected the stone band at the second floor in front of the face of the piers seems a mystery, for this detail not only broke the two-story base into two horizontal layers, but it also prevented the reading of the two-story piers as a set of vertical legs upon which was set the iron-reinforced masonry cage above. Instead, Jenney’s design read more as a stone arcade in the second story that was set atop the very stubby stone piers of the ground floor or basement.
    Not one to shun a challenge or to stop experimenting in the design of his buildings, Root attempted to show how to detail such a base 'better.' He also tried make his base more 'open' than Jenney's elevation by inserting oriel windows between two-story polished red granite columns that had a smaller diameter than an equivalent brick pier (due to granite’s higher compression strength). These columns could have just as easily been inspired by the large columns that Jenney placed at the entrance of the Home Insurance, a detail for which the building had become famous as soon as they were put in place...
  • 486 12 17 April, 2019

Latest Instagram Posts

  • La obra de @mrayasociados es considerada la primera construcción realizada, íntegramente, en acero, producido en la Argentina. Esto es considerado un hito en toda Latinoamérica.
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El arquitecto y su joven equipo tuvieron que inventar una forma nueva de construir el edificio, debido a que no existían antecedentes. Aunque hacer un edificio de acero era algo nuevo en el país, el problema radicaba en construirlo con chapas de tres milímetros de espesor, las más gruesas que se fabricaban.
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Así fue como el Somisa se convirtió en el primer edificio hecho, totalmente, en acero de la Argentina y el primero en el mundo armado mediante soldaduras. Esto le otorgó el titulo de Monumento Histórico Nacional.
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  • La obra de @mrayasociados es considerada la primera construcción realizada, íntegramente, en acero, producido en la Argentina. Esto es considerado un hito en toda Latinoamérica.
    .
    El arquitecto y su joven equipo tuvieron que inventar una forma nueva de construir el edificio, debido a que no existían antecedentes. Aunque hacer un edificio de acero era algo nuevo en el país, el problema radicaba en construirlo con chapas de tres milímetros de espesor, las más gruesas que se fabricaban.
    .
    Así fue como el Somisa se convirtió en el primer edificio hecho, totalmente, en acero de la Argentina y el primero en el mundo armado mediante soldaduras. Esto le otorgó el titulo de Monumento Histórico Nacional.
    .
  • 23 2 10 October, 2019
  • Construido en la ciudad de Chicago, el Home Insurance Building fue diseñado por William Le Baron Jenney, arquitecto perteneciente a la Escuela de Chicago.
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Fue realizado en el año 1885 con estructura principalmente de hierro y acero.
.
Se trata del primer edificio alto que incorporó acero como material estructural y es considerado como el primer rascacielos de la historia, aunque no era el edificio más alto de la época en la ciudad. Fue, la incorporación del acero lo que le brindó ese título, debido a que se trataba de una gran innovación tecnológica en la construcción de aquellos años.
.
Fue demolido en el año 1931, dejando un gran legado para la arquitectura coetánea y posterior.
  • Construido en la ciudad de Chicago, el Home Insurance Building fue diseñado por William Le Baron Jenney, arquitecto perteneciente a la Escuela de Chicago.
    .
    Fue realizado en el año 1885 con estructura principalmente de hierro y acero.
    .
    Se trata del primer edificio alto que incorporó acero como material estructural y es considerado como el primer rascacielos de la historia, aunque no era el edificio más alto de la época en la ciudad. Fue, la incorporación del acero lo que le brindó ese título, debido a que se trataba de una gran innovación tecnológica en la construcción de aquellos años.
    .
    Fue demolido en el año 1931, dejando un gran legado para la arquitectura coetánea y posterior.
  • 33 1 19 September, 2019
  • 🏗️ #SkyscraperDay 🏙️⁣
Mrakodrapy sú technické a architektonické zázraky, ktoré sa dotýkajú neba len 134 rokov.⁣
⁣
Prvý mrakodrap sveta postavili 👷 v roku 1885 v [Šikágu] #Chicago 🇺🇸 a to 10-poschodový #HomeInsuranceBuilding, navrhnutý architektom ✏️ #WilliamLeBaronJenney. Pri stavbe použil rámovú nosnú konštrukciu - namiesto stien 🧱 nesie tiaž oceľová konštrukcia. Tá je pevnejšia, no ľahšia ako železo. 🔩⁣
⁣
Za #mrakodrap sa považuje budova s výškou nad 150 metrov.⁣
⁣
Od roku 2010 je dubajský #BurjKhalifa 🇦🇪 so 163 poschodiami vo výške 828 m doteraz najvyšší mrakodrap sveta. 🔝 Najvyššou budovou Slovenska 🇸🇰 je plánovaný 46-podlažný mrakodrap #EuroveaTower s potvrdenou výškou „len" 168 metrov.⁣
⁣
Deň mrakodrapov 🌇 oslavujeme na pamiatku architekta [šigágskej] školy #LouisSullivan, ktorý sa narodil 🐣 3.9.1856. Mrakodrap síce väčšina z nás nemá v okolí, no pri najbližšej príležitosti nezabudnime na 3.9. 🌆🌃⁣
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#KazdyDenDovodOslavit #tugedr #svetovyden #medzinarodnyden #dnes #deň #oslava #kalendar #dnesoslavujem #stavba #developer #budovy
  • 🏗️ #SkyscraperDay 🏙️⁣
    Mrakodrapy sú technické a architektonické zázraky, ktoré sa dotýkajú neba len 134 rokov.⁣

    Prvý mrakodrap sveta postavili 👷 v roku 1885 v [Šikágu] #Chicago 🇺🇸 a to 10-poschodový #HomeInsuranceBuilding , navrhnutý architektom ✏️ #WilliamLeBaronJenney . Pri stavbe použil rámovú nosnú konštrukciu - namiesto stien 🧱 nesie tiaž oceľová konštrukcia. Tá je pevnejšia, no ľahšia ako železo. 🔩⁣

    Za #mrakodrap sa považuje budova s výškou nad 150 metrov.⁣

    Od roku 2010 je dubajský #BurjKhalifa 🇦🇪 so 163 poschodiami vo výške 828 m doteraz najvyšší mrakodrap sveta. 🔝 Najvyššou budovou Slovenska 🇸🇰 je plánovaný 46-podlažný mrakodrap #EuroveaTower s potvrdenou výškou „len" 168 metrov.⁣

    Deň mrakodrapov 🌇 oslavujeme na pamiatku architekta [šigágskej] školy #LouisSullivan , ktorý sa narodil 🐣 3.9.1856. Mrakodrap síce väčšina z nás nemá v okolí, no pri najbližšej príležitosti nezabudnime na 3.9. 🌆🌃⁣

    #KazdyDenDovodOslavit #tugedr #svetovyden #medzinarodnyden #dnes #deň #oslava #kalendar #dnesoslavujem #stavba #developer #budovy
  • 126 0 2 September, 2019
  • #Ciencia - El primer rascacielos del mundo fue el Home Insurance Building en Chicago. Tiene diez pisos, y fue construido en 1885, por primera empleándose el principio de la construcción de rascacielos, tal y como explica Nikolaus Lenz en el libro de las 1.000 preguntas y respuestas.

Descansa sobre un esqueleto de soportes de acero. Por eso, pudieron ser construidas paredes delgadas y ligeras; la carga descansa sobre el hormigón de acero, presenta el libro.

Si bien ya existían casas de diez pisos en la Antigua Roma, construir casas tan altas solo empezó a ser razonable a partir del invento del ascensor, llevado a cabo por el americano Otis en el año 1857. Este ascensor era tan rudimentario que aún estaba impulsado por vapor. No fue hasta 1889 cuando Otis construyó el primer ascensor eléctrico. Y 5 años más tarde, el americano Reno construyó la primera escalera mecánica, cuyo principio era una escalera, plegada como una cinta, que superó un desnivel tirando hacia arriba.

Hasta 1890, la aguja de 86 metros de Trinity Church, al lado de la Bolsa de Wall Street, fue el edificio más alto de Nueva York (Estados Unidos): fue en ese año cuando se construyó un rascacielos que alojaría al New York World de Joseph Pulitzer.

Síguenos a través de:
Instagram: @elorientaldemonagas
Youtube: El Oriental De Monagas
Facebook: Diario El Oriental
Twitter: @elorientalmon 
#Rascacielos #HomeInsuranceBuilding #Diezpizos #Chicago
  • #Ciencia - El primer rascacielos del mundo fue el Home Insurance Building en Chicago. Tiene diez pisos, y fue construido en 1885, por primera empleándose el principio de la construcción de rascacielos, tal y como explica Nikolaus Lenz en el libro de las 1.000 preguntas y respuestas.

    Descansa sobre un esqueleto de soportes de acero. Por eso, pudieron ser construidas paredes delgadas y ligeras; la carga descansa sobre el hormigón de acero, presenta el libro.

    Si bien ya existían casas de diez pisos en la Antigua Roma, construir casas tan altas solo empezó a ser razonable a partir del invento del ascensor, llevado a cabo por el americano Otis en el año 1857. Este ascensor era tan rudimentario que aún estaba impulsado por vapor. No fue hasta 1889 cuando Otis construyó el primer ascensor eléctrico. Y 5 años más tarde, el americano Reno construyó la primera escalera mecánica, cuyo principio era una escalera, plegada como una cinta, que superó un desnivel tirando hacia arriba.

    Hasta 1890, la aguja de 86 metros de Trinity Church, al lado de la Bolsa de Wall Street, fue el edificio más alto de Nueva York (Estados Unidos): fue en ese año cuando se construyó un rascacielos que alojaría al New York World de Joseph Pulitzer.

    Síguenos a través de:
    Instagram: @elorientaldemonagas
    Youtube: El Oriental De Monagas
    Facebook: Diario El Oriental
    Twitter: @elorientalmon
    #Rascacielos #HomeInsuranceBuilding #Diezpizos #Chicago
  • 11 0 9 August, 2019
  • The Rookery

Burnham & Root

Chicago  1885 
#therookery, #burnhamandroot, #chicagoarchitecture, #johnwellbornroot, #danielburnham, #chicagoarchitecture, #americanarchitecture, #historyofarchitecture, #modernarchitecture, #skyscraper, #homeinsurancebuilding, #williamlebaronjenney, #atrium, #skylight, #ironskeletonframe, #terracotta, #spatialsequence, 
As I mentioned in the first post, the Rookery’s site was large enough that Burnham & Root could employ a double-loaded corridor floor plan.  The inner ring of offices, as did the exterior perimeter offices, still needed direct exterior exposure for daylight and natural ventilation that forced Root to pull the skylight all the way down from its traditional height at the roof to the point where it hovered, somewhat menacingly, over the 62' by 71' atrium at the relatively low level of the third floor (image 1-source: Chuckman’s photos on Wordpress), a detail that echoed W.W. Boyington’s Grand Hotel and George Post’s New York Produce Exchange. Although denied the opportunity to add another of his designs to Chicago's growing collection of tall, light-filled atria (Grannis Block, Burlington, First National Bank, Royal Insurance, and Traders), Root took advantage of the lower location of the Rookery's skylight to offer a visitor the opportunity to penetrate up and through it, blurring the boundary between what was inside and what was outside. 
In essence, the play of contrasts, especially that between outside versus inside and between dark versus light, was the theme of Root's rhapsody of movement through space and light in the Rookery.  Penetrating the dark masonry exterior through the stone triumphal arch (image 2), one entered a two-story vestibule of white stone and onyx with gold-leafed trim (image 3-this was remodeled by Wright in 1905). Stairs at both sides joined overhead in a balcony that beckoned a visitor up to the entresol or mezzanine.  Flanking the stairs going up were vomitoria that led to the basement where the vaults of the building's owner, the Central Safety Deposit Company, were located.
  • The Rookery

    Burnham & Root

    Chicago 1885
    #therookery , #burnhamandroot , #chicagoarchitecture , #johnwellbornroot , #danielburnham , #chicagoarchitecture , #americanarchitecture , #historyofarchitecture , #modernarchitecture , #skyscraper , #homeinsurancebuilding , #williamlebaronjenney , #atrium , #skylight , #ironskeletonframe , #terracotta , #spatialsequence ,
    As I mentioned in the first post, the Rookery’s site was large enough that Burnham & Root could employ a double-loaded corridor floor plan. The inner ring of offices, as did the exterior perimeter offices, still needed direct exterior exposure for daylight and natural ventilation that forced Root to pull the skylight all the way down from its traditional height at the roof to the point where it hovered, somewhat menacingly, over the 62' by 71' atrium at the relatively low level of the third floor (image 1-source: Chuckman’s photos on Wordpress), a detail that echoed W.W. Boyington’s Grand Hotel and George Post’s New York Produce Exchange. Although denied the opportunity to add another of his designs to Chicago's growing collection of tall, light-filled atria (Grannis Block, Burlington, First National Bank, Royal Insurance, and Traders), Root took advantage of the lower location of the Rookery's skylight to offer a visitor the opportunity to penetrate up and through it, blurring the boundary between what was inside and what was outside.
    In essence, the play of contrasts, especially that between outside versus inside and between dark versus light, was the theme of Root's rhapsody of movement through space and light in the Rookery. Penetrating the dark masonry exterior through the stone triumphal arch (image 2), one entered a two-story vestibule of white stone and onyx with gold-leafed trim (image 3-this was remodeled by Wright in 1905). Stairs at both sides joined overhead in a balcony that beckoned a visitor up to the entresol or mezzanine. Flanking the stairs going up were vomitoria that led to the basement where the vaults of the building's owner, the Central Safety Deposit Company, were located.
  • 630 20 24 April, 2019
  • The Rookery

Burnham & Root

Chicago  1885 
#therookery, #burnhamandroot, #chicagoarchitecture, #johnwellbornroot, #danielburnham, #chicagoarchitecture, #americanarchitecture, #historyofarchitecture, #modernarchitecture, #skyscraper, #homeinsurancebuilding, #williamlebaronjenney, #arcade, #superimposedarcades, #georgeafuller, 
In the design of the Rookery’s base, Root was confronted with having to choose between Jenney's clearly-articulated, two-story base of rusticated stone (image 2) or his own recent experiments in blending the stone base and brick body at an intermediate, transition story, which he had employed in the Insurance Exchange.  Evidently, he realized that this experiment was less than satisfactory, for he never again used two different materials in the transition story of his commercial buildings.  In the Rookery, he returned to the standard two-story base of one material, like that of the Home Insurance.  The problem that Root addressed in the design of the Rookery's base (image 3) was quite evident in Jenney's design of the Home Insurance Building's base.  Why Jenney had projected the stone band at the second floor in front of the face of the piers seems a mystery, for this detail not only broke the two-story base into two horizontal layers, but it also prevented the reading of the two-story piers as a set of vertical legs upon which was set the iron-reinforced masonry cage above.  Instead, Jenney’s design read more as a stone arcade in the second story that was set atop the very stubby stone piers of the ground floor or basement. 
Not one to shun a challenge or to stop experimenting in the design of his buildings, Root attempted to show how to detail such a base 'better.' He also tried make his base more 'open' than Jenney's elevation by inserting oriel windows between two-story polished red granite columns that had a smaller diameter than an equivalent brick pier (due to granite’s higher compression strength). These columns could have just as easily been inspired by the large columns that Jenney placed at the entrance of the Home Insurance, a detail for which the building had become famous as soon as they were put in place...
  • The Rookery

    Burnham & Root

    Chicago 1885
    #therookery , #burnhamandroot , #chicagoarchitecture , #johnwellbornroot , #danielburnham , #chicagoarchitecture , #americanarchitecture , #historyofarchitecture , #modernarchitecture , #skyscraper , #homeinsurancebuilding , #williamlebaronjenney , #arcade , #superimposedarcades , #georgeafuller ,
    In the design of the Rookery’s base, Root was confronted with having to choose between Jenney's clearly-articulated, two-story base of rusticated stone (image 2) or his own recent experiments in blending the stone base and brick body at an intermediate, transition story, which he had employed in the Insurance Exchange. Evidently, he realized that this experiment was less than satisfactory, for he never again used two different materials in the transition story of his commercial buildings. In the Rookery, he returned to the standard two-story base of one material, like that of the Home Insurance. The problem that Root addressed in the design of the Rookery's base (image 3) was quite evident in Jenney's design of the Home Insurance Building's base. Why Jenney had projected the stone band at the second floor in front of the face of the piers seems a mystery, for this detail not only broke the two-story base into two horizontal layers, but it also prevented the reading of the two-story piers as a set of vertical legs upon which was set the iron-reinforced masonry cage above. Instead, Jenney’s design read more as a stone arcade in the second story that was set atop the very stubby stone piers of the ground floor or basement.
    Not one to shun a challenge or to stop experimenting in the design of his buildings, Root attempted to show how to detail such a base 'better.' He also tried make his base more 'open' than Jenney's elevation by inserting oriel windows between two-story polished red granite columns that had a smaller diameter than an equivalent brick pier (due to granite’s higher compression strength). These columns could have just as easily been inspired by the large columns that Jenney placed at the entrance of the Home Insurance, a detail for which the building had become famous as soon as they were put in place...
  • 486 12 17 April, 2019
  • The Rookery

Burnham & Root

Chicago  1885 
#therookery, #burnhamandroot, #chicagoarchitecture, #johnwellbornroot, #danielburnham, #chicagoarchitecture, #americanarchitecture, #historyofarchitecture, #modernarchitecture, #skyscraper, #homeinsurancebuilding, #williamlebaronjenney, #urbandesign, #lasallestreet, #atrium, #courtyard, 
In May 1885, John Wellborn Root was provided with an urban design challenge that most architects can only dream of: he and his partner, Daniel Burnham were commissioned by Burnham’s childhood friend, E.C. Waller, to design a 10-story office building for the southeast corner of La Salle and Adams Streets, what had been the location of one of the city’s water tanks around which Chicago’s “temporary” city hall was erected following the 1871 fire.  As the tower had been the home to numerous birds, its name, “The Rookery” had been cynically carried over to City Hall in honor of the political shenanigans (bird droppings) for which Chicago was already infamous.  Immediately across La Salle Street on the southwest block sat Root’s own Insurance Exchange (image 2), completed in 1884, while the Adams facade would be facing the side elevation of William Le Baron Jenney's Home Insurance Building (image 3), then just beginning construction. 
The new building that would also be known as “The Rookery,” against the wishes of its owners, not only provided Root with the opportunity to show how far this new building type, the skyscraper had evolved both in design and in construction technology during the past hectic twelve months, but also demanded of him a certain urbanistic response in its design to attempt to synthesize the alignment of the geometries of the two existing buildings in his design of the new building’s facades: as the Rookery would directly face the Insurance Exchange with approximately the same length of facade along La Salle, the opportunity to create a portal to Chicago's financial district (image 4) with these two brick bookends was one that Root must have quietly savored.  It is intriguing then, to wonder why he did not use the cherry red brick of the Insurance Exchange, but opted instead for a reddish-brown brick for the ...
  • The Rookery

    Burnham & Root

    Chicago 1885
    #therookery , #burnhamandroot , #chicagoarchitecture , #johnwellbornroot , #danielburnham , #chicagoarchitecture , #americanarchitecture , #historyofarchitecture , #modernarchitecture , #skyscraper , #homeinsurancebuilding , #williamlebaronjenney , #urbandesign , #lasallestreet , #atrium , #courtyard ,
    In May 1885, John Wellborn Root was provided with an urban design challenge that most architects can only dream of: he and his partner, Daniel Burnham were commissioned by Burnham’s childhood friend, E.C. Waller, to design a 10-story office building for the southeast corner of La Salle and Adams Streets, what had been the location of one of the city’s water tanks around which Chicago’s “temporary” city hall was erected following the 1871 fire. As the tower had been the home to numerous birds, its name, “The Rookery” had been cynically carried over to City Hall in honor of the political shenanigans (bird droppings) for which Chicago was already infamous. Immediately across La Salle Street on the southwest block sat Root’s own Insurance Exchange (image 2), completed in 1884, while the Adams facade would be facing the side elevation of William Le Baron Jenney's Home Insurance Building (image 3), then just beginning construction.
    The new building that would also be known as “The Rookery,” against the wishes of its owners, not only provided Root with the opportunity to show how far this new building type, the skyscraper had evolved both in design and in construction technology during the past hectic twelve months, but also demanded of him a certain urbanistic response in its design to attempt to synthesize the alignment of the geometries of the two existing buildings in his design of the new building’s facades: as the Rookery would directly face the Insurance Exchange with approximately the same length of facade along La Salle, the opportunity to create a portal to Chicago's financial district (image 4) with these two brick bookends was one that Root must have quietly savored. It is intriguing then, to wonder why he did not use the cherry red brick of the Insurance Exchange, but opted instead for a reddish-brown brick for the ...
  • 458 11 11 April, 2019
  • Birthplace of the Skyscraper and metal Beans
  • Birthplace of the Skyscraper and metal Beans
  • 90 1 4 March, 2019
  • قسمت سوم
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در پست قبل به ساختمانهایی اشاره شد که تحولات بسیار گسترده ای در زمینه ی ساختمان سازی بوجود آورد و راه را برای بکارگیری مصالح و فناوری جدید باز کرد.
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اما معماری مدرن به صورت یک مکتب معماری با مبانی نظری مدون و ساختمانهایی بر اساس اندیشه مدرن از اواخر قرن ۱۹ میلادی شکل گرفت.شهر شیکاگو در امریکا و شهرهای بروکسل و پاریس در اروپا خاستگاه این معماری بودند.
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بر اساس ویژگیهای نظری و هنری ، معماری مدرن را می توان به سه دوره معماری مدرن اولیه، متعالی و متاخر تقسیم بندی کرد.
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مکتب شیکاگو
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شیکاگو در اواخر قرن ۱۹ مرکز خطوط راه اهن و ارتباط بین شرق و غرب امریکا بود. همچنین این شهر مرکز تجارت مهمی به شمار می آمد و از سال ۱۸۸۵ فعالیتهای شدید اقتصادی و به تبع آن اجرای ساختمانهای تجاری و اداری آغاز شده بود.
با توجه به اینکه آتش سوزی سال ۱۸۷۱ بیشتر قسمتهای این شهر را ازبین برد، لذا زمینه برای تحولات جدید آماده بود.
در این زمان مهندسان سازه و معماران جوانی وجود داشتند که عمدتا در اروپای غربی و شهرهای شرق امریکا مانند بوستون و نیویورک تحصیل کرده بودند.
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ساختمانهای این دوره اولین الگوی ساختمانهای مدرن امروزی بود. برجهای با سازه های فولادی و کرتن وال به سرعت گسترش یافت و پنجره هایی به نام پنجره شیکاگو یا پنجره خلیج از ابداعات این دوره است.
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برای دیدن ساختمانها و معماران مشهور این دوره عکسها را ورق بزنید👆👆
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در پست بعدی به ادامه معرفی سبک شیکاگو خواهم پرداخت.
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#کتاب_معماری_معاصر_غرب
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#معماری#معماری_مدرن_اولیه#معماری_داخلی#معماری_معاصر_غرب#سبک_شیکاگو##دکوراسیون#معرفی_سبکهای_معماری#سبکهای_معماری #architecture #chicagoschool#modernarchitecture#earlymodernarchitecture#reliancebuilding#tacomabuilding#monadnockbuilding#homeinsurancebuilding#fairstore#wiliamlebaronjenny#masonictemple#burnhamandroot#decoration#interiordesign#interior#architecturestyle#historyofarchitecture
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  • قسمت سوم
    .
    در پست قبل به ساختمانهایی اشاره شد که تحولات بسیار گسترده ای در زمینه ی ساختمان سازی بوجود آورد و راه را برای بکارگیری مصالح و فناوری جدید باز کرد.
    .
    اما معماری مدرن به صورت یک مکتب معماری با مبانی نظری مدون و ساختمانهایی بر اساس اندیشه مدرن از اواخر قرن ۱۹ میلادی شکل گرفت.شهر شیکاگو در امریکا و شهرهای بروکسل و پاریس در اروپا خاستگاه این معماری بودند.
    .
    بر اساس ویژگیهای نظری و هنری ، معماری مدرن را می توان به سه دوره معماری مدرن اولیه، متعالی و متاخر تقسیم بندی کرد.
    .
    مکتب شیکاگو
    .
    شیکاگو در اواخر قرن ۱۹ مرکز خطوط راه اهن و ارتباط بین شرق و غرب امریکا بود. همچنین این شهر مرکز تجارت مهمی به شمار می آمد و از سال ۱۸۸۵ فعالیتهای شدید اقتصادی و به تبع آن اجرای ساختمانهای تجاری و اداری آغاز شده بود.
    با توجه به اینکه آتش سوزی سال ۱۸۷۱ بیشتر قسمتهای این شهر را ازبین برد، لذا زمینه برای تحولات جدید آماده بود.
    در این زمان مهندسان سازه و معماران جوانی وجود داشتند که عمدتا در اروپای غربی و شهرهای شرق امریکا مانند بوستون و نیویورک تحصیل کرده بودند.
    .
    ساختمانهای این دوره اولین الگوی ساختمانهای مدرن امروزی بود. برجهای با سازه های فولادی و کرتن وال به سرعت گسترش یافت و پنجره هایی به نام پنجره شیکاگو یا پنجره خلیج از ابداعات این دوره است.
    .
    برای دیدن ساختمانها و معماران مشهور این دوره عکسها را ورق بزنید👆👆
    .
    در پست بعدی به ادامه معرفی سبک شیکاگو خواهم پرداخت.
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    #کتاب_معماری_معاصر_غرب
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    #معماری #معماری_مدرن_اولیه #معماری_داخلی #معماری_معاصر_غرب #سبک_شیکاگو # #دکوراسیون #معرفی_سبکهای_معماری #سبکهای_معماری #architecture #chicagoschool #modernarchitecture #earlymodernarchitecture #reliancebuilding #tacomabuilding #monadnockbuilding #homeinsurancebuilding #fairstore #wiliamlebaronjenny #masonictemple #burnhamandroot #decoration #interiordesign #interior #architecturestyle #historyofarchitecture
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  • 42 1 25 October, 2018
  • Did you know the Savoy theater was the first public building lit entirely by electricity? Only four years before the Builders Exchange of Michigan was established!
  • Did you know the Savoy theater was the first public building lit entirely by electricity? Only four years before the Builders Exchange of Michigan was established!
  • 24 3 18 October, 2018
  • SKYSCRAPER. The Home Insurance Building in Chicago is considered the first true skyscraper because it had a steel frame. Built in 1884, it was 10 stories tall. #skyscraper #homeinsurancebuilding
  • SKYSCRAPER. The Home Insurance Building in Chicago is considered the first true skyscraper because it had a steel frame. Built in 1884, it was 10 stories tall. #skyscraper #homeinsurancebuilding
  • 19 2 6 July, 2018
  • 🇧🇷 DOMINGO DE CURIOSIDADE: O Primeiro arranha céu do mundo foi construído em Chicago, Estados Unidos. Seu nome era Home Insurance Building. Antes dele ser construído, as pessoas estavam preocupadas com os elevadores e com medo que a estrutura não aguentasse. Até que um homem chamado William Jenney descobriu uma maneira de utilizar vigas de aço para o esqueleto do edifício (enquanto outros edifícios usavam tijolos). O edifício foi concluído em 1885, mas infelizmente foi demolido em 1931. Building tinha 10 andares e 138 metros de altura. ----- 🇺🇸 SUNDAY CURIOSITY: The first skyscraper in the world was built in Chicago, USA. Its name was Home Insurance Building. Before this building, people were worried about the elevators and afraid that the structure of the building wasn’t strong enough. Then a man named William Jenney discovered a way to use steel beams for the skeleton of the building (as other buildings was using bricks). This building was completed in 1885, but unfortunately it was demolished in 1931. The Home Insurance Building had 10 floors and 138 meters high. #checkincompaulamaluf #domingodecuriosidade #sundaycuriosity #prediomaisantigodomundo #building #predioshistoricos #oldestbuilding #homeinsurancebuilding #curiosidadededomingo
  • 🇧🇷 DOMINGO DE CURIOSIDADE: O Primeiro arranha céu do mundo foi construído em Chicago, Estados Unidos. Seu nome era Home Insurance Building. Antes dele ser construído, as pessoas estavam preocupadas com os elevadores e com medo que a estrutura não aguentasse. Até que um homem chamado William Jenney descobriu uma maneira de utilizar vigas de aço para o esqueleto do edifício (enquanto outros edifícios usavam tijolos). O edifício foi concluído em 1885, mas infelizmente foi demolido em 1931. Building tinha 10 andares e 138 metros de altura. ----- 🇺🇸 SUNDAY CURIOSITY: The first skyscraper in the world was built in Chicago, USA. Its name was Home Insurance Building. Before this building, people were worried about the elevators and afraid that the structure of the building wasn’t strong enough. Then a man named William Jenney discovered a way to use steel beams for the skeleton of the building (as other buildings was using bricks). This building was completed in 1885, but unfortunately it was demolished in 1931. The Home Insurance Building had 10 floors and 138 meters high. #checkincompaulamaluf #domingodecuriosidade #sundaycuriosity #prediomaisantigodomundo #building #predioshistoricos #oldestbuilding #homeinsurancebuilding #curiosidadededomingo
  • 438 4 3 July, 2016
  • Sabias que el primer rascacielos en la historia fue el #homeinsurancebuilding construido en chicago con una altura máxima de 10 pisos terminado en 1885, En Panamá la primera estructura de este estilo fue el #americantradeHotel construido en el año de 1917 con 4 pisos de altura, se le conocía como el castillo de greyskull... Que diferencia con la vista de la cinta costera cuando corres ahhhh!!!!
P.D. Para los sabiondos que van a venir que la torre de Panamá vieja y tal, pues al ser una edificación  estilo colonial del siglo XVII no es considerada un rascacielos por el tipo de arquitectura y estructura 😒😒😒... ya me los conozco bola de montoneros!!!
  • Sabias que el primer rascacielos en la historia fue el #homeinsurancebuilding construido en chicago con una altura máxima de 10 pisos terminado en 1885, En Panamá la primera estructura de este estilo fue el #americantradeHotel construido en el año de 1917 con 4 pisos de altura, se le conocía como el castillo de greyskull... Que diferencia con la vista de la cinta costera cuando corres ahhhh!!!!
    P.D. Para los sabiondos que van a venir que la torre de Panamá vieja y tal, pues al ser una edificación estilo colonial del siglo XVII no es considerada un rascacielos por el tipo de arquitectura y estructura 😒😒😒... ya me los conozco bola de montoneros!!!
  • 600 20 11 May, 2016